ALBUM REVIEW: Blut Aus Nord – Disharmonium – Undreamable Abysses


Blut Aus Nord is not available for interviews” proclaims the press release accompanying Disharmonium — Undreamable Abysses (Debemur Morti), the band’s fourteenth full album since their inception in the mid-nineties. That Blut Aus Nord are conspicuous about being enigmatic says a lot about their attitude.

 

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FESTIVAL REVIEW: DesertFest London 2022 – Various Venues


Desertfest, GloomyLightsPhotography

2022 is a special year for desert rock / stoner rock / doom metal extravaganza Desertfest London. The event, which takes place across multiple venues in and around Camden and has become a mainstay of the UK heavy music scene, was cancelled in 2020 for obvious reasons and then rescheduled as a special 10-year anniversary event for 2021. Inevitably, the 2021 festival was again cancelled, so the 2022 edition is not only the first Desertfest London for three years, but also a chance to celebrate in earnest a “Decade in the Desert”.

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EP REVIEW: De Arma – Nightcall


De Arma’s new three-track EP Nightcall marks something of a turning point for the Swedish gothic rock band. Following their 2021 album Strayed in Shadows, the band have now signed a multi-album deal with Silent Future Recordings, for whom Nightcall is the first offering.

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ALBUM REVIEW: Bhleg – Fäghring


Bhleg are an enigmatic and mysterious Swedish group who meld a kind of progressive black metal with traditional European folk music. Fäghring (Nordvis) is their fourth full-length offering and completes a “tetralogy” of records which began with Draumr Ast in 2014. The band consists of three members known only by single letters — S (who primarily plays guitar and bass as well as some vocals, but also adds traditional and unorthodox instruments including lyre, hurdy-gurdy, mouth harp, keyboards, bullroarer, birch trumpet, frame drums, birch sticks, and stones), L (lead vocals) and H (drums). Their promo photos and album cover show the members amongst woodland, hidden beneath cloaks and flowery headdresses, holding traditional instruments and strange blood-soaked wooden dolls.Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: GGGOLDDD – This Shame Should Not Be Mine


GGGOLDDD, based in the Netherlands, have for the past decade been releasing material that defies genre conventions and blurs the boundaries between all manner of musical styles, from Metal, to post-Punk, to Pop, to Trip-Hop. Their fifth full-length release, This Shame Should Not Be Mine (Artoffact Records) is based around deeply personal themes to vocalist Milena Eva, who uses this record, conceived during the 2020 lockdown, to address traumatic events including sexual assault.

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ALBUM REVIEW: E-L-R – Vexier


Vexier, the sophomore full-length from Switzerland’s enigmatic post-metal / doomgaze / experimental rock outfit E-L-R (Prophecy Productions), is a record that takes its time to get where it needs to. The record features five tracks spanning a total of 45 minutes; the shortest song is more than six-and-a-half minutes.

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ALBUM REVIEW: Sylvaine – Nova


 

Sylvaine is the pseudonym of Norway’s Kathrine Shepard, a classically trained composer, singer, and multi-instrumentalist. Since 2014 Shepard has been releasing albums as Sylvaine, of which Nova (Season of Mist) will be the fourth (not counting a 2020 split with Unreqvited).

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PODCAST: Episode 152: Duncan Evans Interviews Sylvaine About “Nova” and More!


Ghost Cult’s Duncan Evans interviews artist Sylvaine about her upcoming new album Nova due out on March 4th, 2022 via Season of Mist. The two artists delved into her career, new album, and much more. Interview by Duncan Evans (https://www.instagram.com/duncanevansmusic). Audio editing by Omar Cordy of OJC Photography (https://www.instagram.com/ojcpics). Theme music by Salted Wounds (https://www.instagram.com/saltedwoundsnyc).

ALBUM REVIEW: Emma Ruth Rundle – Engine Of Hell


Emma Ruth Rundle seems to have become an artist with a licence to shift around stylistically as much as she wants while still maintaining, and continuing to build, her devoted fanbase. Last year’s revered collaboration with ThouMay Our Chambers Be Full (Sacred Bones) was dense, heavy, aggressive and complex. Whilst everything Rundle turns her hand to shares a certain delicate and fragile emotional openness, Engine Of Hell (Sargent House) in most other senses explores the opposite end of the Emma Ruth Rundle sonic spectrum.

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