PODCAST: Episode 111: Henry Derek Elis on His Solo Career and Inspiration

Ghost Cult scribe Duncan Evans caught up by phone with singer-songwriter Henry Derek Elis for an interview about his new covers EP, All The Pretty Little Horses. Henry is best known as the former vocalist for metal bands Scar The Martyr and Act of Defiance, but his solo career has taken him down a path closer to Outlaw Country, Americana, and Dark Folk. Henry chatted about the new EP, his choice of artists to cover such as Danzig and Billy Idol, the difference between his metal music and solo career, his take on how watered-down “folk” music has become his influences and opinions of classic artists, and much more. You can order Henry’s music at this link: Continue reading

Kaipa – Sattyg

Sattyg

Despite not being one of Prog’s most celebrated acts, Kaipa have magnificent legacy that spans near 40 years (18 years of which spent on a hiatus in fairness, but still not to be taken lightly) with a branch of prog that encompasses symphonic music, Swedish traditional folk and explorative, tangent minded melodies. Since their reunion in 2000 there has been a plethora of rich additions to their history, with Sattyg (InsideOut/Century Media) the band’s latest.

Their tendency for colouful, fantasy based atmosphere remains present on Sattyg, and musically it doesn’t venture from their previous sound, which in itself is a cauldron of diverse influences, and here even including hints of medieval-like instrumentation married with an overall classic prog warmth, all producing an eclectic sound that transmits an impression that is neither dated nor current, with slight shades of a metallic feel in part.

One of Sattyg’s real strengths is the vocal combinations of Patrik Lundstrom and Aleena Gibson, both in their own displays, Gibson in particular a unique and vocally free spirit, who excel as a combined force who wed their harmonies and interplay together, proving as adventurous at times as the accompanying musical shifts.

An aural swirl that indulges the senses for nigh on 70 minutes across 7 reflective, meditative and eccentric musical passages, the sextet casually unfurl their folky and progressive indulgences, unhurried and unpressured, allowing each track to expand and develop as if in its’ own microcosm.  Yes, it may sit too much on the side of whimsy, for some but most will find an album with a multitude of layers, styles and nuances drawn from a palette of rich colours.

One of Progressive music’s underrated gems have added another jewel to their underplayed legacy.

 

8.0/10

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CHRIS TIPPELL