ALBUM REVIEW: Dashboard Confessional – All The Truth That I Can Tell


A contemplative, but serene gaze out of the window, as a hazy half-smile plays on the corner of the lips. Half a memory aligns with the story that is playing in the ears, but it has its own shade and hue, something the same but different, but definitely and absolutely connected. ‘Me and Mine’, the second song in a breathy, intimate, quietly sung middle of the album causes pause to reflect. A simple song about children, how being a parent as your kids grow up can be, it’s about closeness… And it is genuine.

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ALBUM REVIEW: Frank Turner – FTHC


There are a lot of great storytellers in the world. For over fifteen years as a solo artist, Hardcore kid and childhood Heavy Metal devotee Frank Turner has mined the considerable depths of his life experience to bring his raw delivery, and his unique take on the human condition. His transparent honesty as a person and artist has earned him a lot of love from fans, and respect in general from his peers. At the end of the day, he’s just a regular guy, sharing his story. Much like the rest of us, but sorting it out one verse, one song, one album at a time.

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ALBUM REVIEW: Rolo Tomassi – Where Myth Becomes Memory


They say no band is really an “overnight success” in the music industry. Like most cliches, that one has been ridden into the ground by lazy people. Rolo Tomassi has been a band for over fifteen years at this point, and if their ascent to the top of the underground metal genre has taken you by surprise, you just weren’t paying attention. The band has been DIY (with some proper distro mixed in) the entire way, making music on their own terms, gathering forces of fans and waves of respect. Wearing many musical masks and expertly jumping from Grindcore, to Thrash, Hardcore, Pop Rock and even Blackened extremism, the band has always sported loads of talent and great songs. For their debut album for MNRK Music, Where Myth Becomes Memory, the band is determined to change your perception of the band, even if you are a longtime fan.

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ALBUM REVIEW: Amigo The Devil – Born Against


There are many ways unironically describe the last year or so of human life in a manner we can all appreciate. A lot of us use sarcasm and deflection as a means to cope, and it shows. We may become numb to our own reality based on a lot of loss and sadness, and the mass psychotic break the world seems to have suffered. If you are here reading these words, hopefully,you are looking for an escape from the mundane in some good music. Music is here for you, both as a hug to say “it’s gonna be OK,” but also to commiserate with someone who has been there through the muck, just like you. Danny Kiranos, a.k.a. Amigo The Devil has found a foothold in our musical diet, a needed figure to tell the unpleasant truths about that muck and mire we need to learn from, or just relate to. He asks us to look with him and at ourselves too. He does this to a bold effect on his new album, Born Against (Liar’s Club Records, Regime Music Group).

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PODCAST: Episode 126: John Connolly of Sevendust on “Blood and Stone”


Ghost Cult’s Keefy caught up with John Connolly of Sevendust to chat about their new album, Blood and Stone, releasing on October 23rd, 2020 via Rise Records. We discussed the making of the new album, releasing new music during this uncertain time, the more adult themes of the band’s music these days, how the band approaches songwriting, working with producer Elvis Baskette, the decision to cover Soundgarden’s “The Day I Tried To Live” and how they almost didn’t go through with it and more. Purchase the album here and listen to our chat right now.

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ALBUM REVIEW: MJ Guider – Sour Cherry Bell


Sour Cherry Bell (Kranky) is the second full-length release from New Orleans-based artist Melissa Guion, who releases music under the moniker MJ Guider. It primarily deals in atmosphere. Guion uses heavily processed electronic textures, often drenched in thick treacle-like reverb, to create moody and evocative soundscapes. There are synthetic drum sounds, but this is certainly not dance music. The emotion-laden washy chord sequences recall the 1980s “Gothic” music and perhaps the “shoegaze” that followed in its footsteps, but this is music that doesn’t fit neatly into any category. Many of the sound-worlds have a lush warmth which lends them a meditative quality, but there is also an unsettling element of tension, as though dissonance and harmony are in competition with each other. Guion’s voice is tender and graceful and with it, she weaves flowing melodies. But the voice is often intentionally distant – buried in the mix and concealed by long reverb tails. It feels as though Guion has intentionally engineered a situation where opposing elements battle it out for dominance. These songs could have been presented in a radio-friendly indie package, but instead, the melodies and words only just lift their heads above the walls of noise that encase them. It takes audacity and boldness to attempt this sort of approach which flouts so many of the accepted rules of composition and music production. It seems that Guion was pushing the boundaries of her creativity and her tools: “I was curious to see how far I could go with them, even if that meant reaching the ends of their capacity to do what I wanted.”Continue reading


PODCAST: Episode 118 – Kalen Chase Talks New Singles, Gospel Influences and More!


Ghost Cult caught up with singer-songwriter Kalen Chase recently to discuss his recent series of singles, including “Good Things”, out now. We talked to the former lead vocalist of VIMIC (with Joey Jordison, ex-Slipknot) and Korn live member about the long and winding road of his career, his approach to songwriting, working with Brian Viglione of The Dresden Dolls, his upcoming new single “Let Them Come”, the country album he is writing with his brother, writing for other artists versus keeping songs for himself and much more. Purchase new Kalen Chase music here and check out our chat.
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CLASSIC ALBUMS REVISITED: The Cult – “Sonic Temple” Turns 30


The Cult is celebrating thirty years of their classic Sonic Temple (Beggars Banquet). Produced by Bob Rock, the album has a lot is fingerprints on it: huge live drum sounds, choir-like vocal parts, layers of guitar tracks, and a ready-made arena rock sound that suited the band perfectly. Continue reading


Keep Riding The Horse: Richard Williams Of Kansas


 

kansas_band-photo-2015-by-marti-griffin

In Part 2 of our chat with Richard Williams of Kansas, we discussed the new make up of the band, and how it made the difference their new album The Prelude Implicit. We also discussed their relationship with their label, touring, and when and if the band plans to retire at some point.Continue reading


No Limits- Rich Williams Of Kansas


 

kansas_band-photo-2015-by-marti-griffin

Kansas is one of the greatest bands of all-time, and certainly the best progressive rock band to ever come out of America. The band is best known for their slew of radio friendly cuts from the 70s, but always had strong rock albums musically, and were top-tier musicians, especially live. They are back this month with their first new album in over a decade and half, The Prelude Implicit, from InsideOut Music. Longtime guitarist, and band leader Rich Williams chatted with Keith Chachkes of Ghost Cult to discuss changes in the group, their bright new future.Continue reading