ALBUM REVIEW: Kid Kapichi – Here’s What You Could Have Won


 

Fusing the punch of distorted guitar with funky drums and free-thinking lyrics, Hastings, UK-based quartet Kid Kapichi show off their distinctive ‘beat punk’ style with their new album Here’s What You Could Have Won (Spinefarm Records). The title represents opportunities certain groups miss out on due to poverty, discrimination, or mental health. Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: Beddy Rays – Beddy Rays


 

It feels like day 666 of blazing sun in the year of our dark lord 2022, as Satan’s domain continues to take control and roast our planet (climate change, what climate change?), yet finally, and oh so sweetly timed as we hit holiday season, in the words of The Undertones ‘Here Comes The Summer!’ And, boy, do we have the perfect sunshine accompaniment in the form of the beer-and-beach party punk rock of Beddy Rays and their self-titled, self-released debut. And the aforementioned Undertones smash isn’t a bad place to start in terms of the style and sound of this joyous album teaming, like rock pools with crustaceans, with ear-worms and great tunes. Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: Dune Rats – Real Rare Whale


 

With the majority of rock bands using their platforms to speak out about common world issues through blunt execution, Australian trio Dune Rats acknowledges those issues with their own amusing perspective. Their new album Real Rare Whale (BMG) was written in an effort to fight off the negativity brought on by the pandemic using rowdy feel-good tunes. With this new release, the band says, “Life is hard, but let’s have all the fun we can while we’re here.”Continue reading


EP REVIEW: Shooting Daggers – Athames


Any punk fan who has had to suffer through sexism or any form of discrimination knows how cathartic loud, unfiltered music can be. For bands like the UK’s Shooting Daggers, turning that rage into a career is the most effective way to keep their sanity. They appropriately characterize themselves as feminist hardcore punk and queercore, spreading empowering messages that stand against misogyny and abuse with a Riot Grrrl angle. Influenced by G.L.O.S.S., Gel, Turnstile and the like, this trio will give you a mentally productive thirst for thrashing away all your repressed anger and disgust.

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ALBUM REVIEW: Short Stack – Maybe There’s No Heaven


Australian pop-rock trio Short Stack have put out their fifth studio album Maybe There’s No Heaven (UNFD), using it as a means to tell the story of their career ups and downs and love lives since their debut Stack Is The New Black in 2009. Though it has its faults, punchy choruses and exhilarating instrumentals come and go to keep it worth hearing more. Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: Weatherstate – Never Better


Weymouth-based punks Weatherstate have returned with their second album, Never Better (Rude Records), a lethargic commentary on the current state of the world. Bringing a unique edginess to pop-Punk, the band shines a light on the common outlook of society over the past few years. The vocals deliver an ironic unity of bouncy melodies and jeering grittiness. Though they provide a limited range in pitch and tone, the monotony works for the record’s apathetic theme.

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ALBUM REVIEW: The Bronx – Bronx XI


Despite 19 years in the business, American punk rockers The Bronx’s new album Bronx VI (Cooking Vinyl) is just as energetic and full on as ever. This is the sixth record – funnily enough – from the L.A. based quintet and ‘White Shadow’ starts things off with a bang; a tone setting blast of snappy punk, bristling with pace and swagger.

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ALBUM REVIEW: Cro-Mags – In The Beginning


Having successfully secured the Cro-Mags name after a year-long court battle with former members John Joseph and Mackie Jayson, frontman and general hardcore legend Harley Flanagan follows up last year’s From the Grave and Don’t Give In EP’s (Victory Records) with In the Beginning (Mission Two Entertainment/Arising Empire), the first full-length release from the celebrated New York act in twenty long years. Continue reading


Holy Tongues – Weak People


HT cover web

The demise of angry yet thoughtful hardcore types Ruiner back in 2010 was mourned hard by those who preferred a little more variety with their tough-guy rage workouts, but ultimately their passing wasn’t noticed by the masses. However several members of the band in question have decided to re-group and have another go in the form of Holy Tongues, playing a style of music with one foot in the hardcore camp but seemingly eager to leave old habits behind.

Weak People (Melotov Records) is the debut effort by Dustin Thornton, Stephen Smeal and Joey Edwards; all previous members of the aforementioned Ruiner. Clocking in at thirty-four minutes, the album is a short yet interesting exploration of the uncertain ground where melodic hardcore meets noise rock; imagine Unsane playing around with a few old Poison the Well B-sides and you have an idea of the sounds captured on Weak People. The rhythm section is particularly impressive with the twanging bass guitar and playful drums establishing a solid background while the guitars lay down just as many squalling noise and melodic lines as they do anything approaching the thicker riffs one might expect from this sub-genre.

Tracks such as ‘Filters’ build nicely along a hefty bassline with the guitars brooding in a confident manner while ‘92’ kicks out the jams in fine punkish style. Elsewhere, the melodic introspection of ‘Bright Light’ proves to be an engaging listen with the soul-searching lyrics painting a bittersweet picture of the life of a young band-member.

For all the thoughtfulness however, there is no real energy or passion evident on Weak People with the band clearly still finding their feet. However, given time, there is potential for something special to emerge.

6.0/10.0

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JAMES CONWAY