INTERVIEW: Janosch Rathmer of Long Distance Calling on “Eraser” and Concept Albums


 

Ghost Cult recently caught up with Janosch Rathmer of instrumental post-rock band Long Distance Calling, to discuss their new album Eraser – out now via earMUSIC. Read our review here. Janosch discussed LDC being prolific writers, spending extra time on the new album, concept records and music videos, sexy saxophone parts, playing festivals versus intimate venues, touring in the pandemic era, switching record labels, climate change, and more!

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ALBUM REVIEW: Crippled Black Pheonix – Benefyre


 

Banefyre (Season of Mist) is the twelfth album from Crippled Black Phoenix, the category-defying collective centred around Justin Greaves, a former doom metal drummer (for bands such as Electric Wizard and Iron Monkey) turned multi-instrumentalist songwriter. The current studio lineup of the band has Greaves joined by longstanding vocalist Belinda Kordic, plus more recent recruits Helen Stanley (keys, synths, trumpet), Andy Taylor (guitars), and new second vocalist and third guitarist Joel Segerstedt.

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ALBUM REVIEWS ROUND-UP: The HU – Revival Black – Long Distance Calling – Miss May I – Beach Rats


 

The HU – Rumble of Thunder (Better Noise)

The HU and their joyful rock laced with Mongolian folk condiments rode into our collective consciences with 2019’s brilliant The Gereg, establishing themselves immediately by managing to produce something new, yet simultaneously neither novelty nor cheesy despite its requisite ingredients. A skilful piece of musical chef-ery indeed. Second time around, the HU have sought to refine things a little, less bold in some of their choices, yet with an eye on producing something more palatable to more people now that the attention has been piqued.Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: God Is An Astronaut – The Beginning Of The End


 

For the twenty-year anniversary of their debut album The End Of The Beginning, post-rock wizards God Is An Astronaut have revamped the record in a live studio setting, reversing the title to The Beginning Of The End (Napalm Records). The new recordings polish the songs up, flashing the band’s growth in musicianship while staying true to the original song structures. The improved production and performance have each instrument sounding more well-balanced, enhancing every melody and soundscape to a more cinematic level, revealing their fullest potentials. Continue reading