ALBUM REVIEW: Silvertomb – Edge of Existence

One of the most anticipated albums of 2019, Silvertomb is made up of some pretty famous alumni of pretty legendary bands. Flying behind the sails of creativity from the talents of Kenny Hickey and Johnny Kelly of Type O Negative fame, the pair have played together since their were teens, and in other bands as well. But this time with help from some other stellar musicians, they have really coalesced sound of their influences, mainly classic Doom, Prog Rock, and Stoner Rock, into a signature style, to create the music that makes up their full-length debut album, Edge of Existence (Longbranch/SPV). Continue reading

PODCAST: Episode 12: Erik Olson of Lord Dying Talks New Album, Going Prog, and The Afterlife

Ghost Cult had the pleasure of chatting with vocalist/guitarist Erik Olson of Lord Dying recently for the podcast. He chatted about the bands’ new album, Mysterium Tremendum, releasing via their new record label eOne on April 26th. Erik talked about the loss of a loved one that drove the content of the album, new members in the bands, concept albums, and getting in touch with their psychedelic and progressive side. You can pre-order the album in all formats here, and check out our chat!  Continue reading

Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain – 25 Years Later

For those of a certain age, the news that twenty-five years have passed since the death of Kurt Donald Cobain will scarcely be believable. But it is 25 years and yes, you do now feel old. You probably still feel sad and melancholy. Time has a terrible way of playing tricks with your memory but the passing of Nirvana’s frontman still resonates as if it were yesterday. The past remains, undoubtedly, a foreign country but I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing. I was in laundrette in Bristol, England doing a weekend load of washing (this is what students did then). I was listening to the BBC on my five-year-old Sony radio walkman- remember those?- when the terrible, heart-stopping news came through on that grey, terrible slate grey April day.

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CLASSIC ALBUMS REVISITED: Mastodon Breaks Through With “Crack The Skye”

After emerging from the muddy underground in a wonderful muck of sludge, prog, hardcore, and doomy weirdness out of Atlanta in the early aughts, Mastodon built up a strong reputation after their crucial third album, Blood Mountain (Reprise). They were not shy about embracing their proggier side, and they never needed a push over the edge to go fully away from most conventional types of metal they were known for at the time. Their second major label album came at a time of transition that would alter the course of the band and see them leave the underground and embrace a different path. That change led to the creation of Crack The Skye (Reprise) which is now ten years old.

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King 810 – Suicide King

The resurgence of 1990s Nu Metal shouldn’t be a real shock to anyone of a certain age. The enduring music put down by Korn, early-Deftones, Limp Bizkit, Snot, and many others funneled the heaviness of metal and the flavor of Hip-Hip from the decade before into an intoxicating blend. And while I love my trad metal brothers and sisters for repping songs about swords, wizards, and dragons; they were likely never stopped and frisked by cops, seen friends die in a hail of bullets, or poisoned by lead in their water. King 810 have, and they have become the flag bearers of what music marketing expert Finn McKenty (The Punk Rock MBA)calls crossover culture. Kids are more genre agnostic than ever, and when a band can filter past influences and present it to modern audiences a new and unique way, they click big-time. Fans love a groove they can latch on too and lyrics that feel authentic. King 810’s last album La Petite Mort Or A Conversation With God showed they were far from the run of the mill. They take it up another notch on Suicide King (KINGNation). Continue reading

Architects – Holy Hell

It’s that gap between hope and expectation that we often fall through. Let’s be honest, your hope levels for Architects’ new album Holy Hell (Epitaph) might be stratospheric, but your expectations…? Given what this band has been through in terms of loss, sorrow and anguish, you could easily have fallen into that space of hoping for the best but guarding your expectations. It might be enough just that they simply deliver us something, anything, yes? Continue reading

Pijn – Loss


Several years ago I reviewed a local gig containing a set by Manchester-based post-Hardcore band Knifecrimes, and enjoyed a chat with their fresh-faced East Anglian guitarist. These days Joe Clayton still classes Manchester as home but is now a sought-after producer and mastermind of the multi-faceted, enigmatic Pijn, whose first album proper Loss (Holy Roar) is a pulsing ball of creativity. Continue reading