Metallica Classic Song Heard In Ted Bundy Film with James Hetfield

If you are a fan of Metallica or serial killers, you have likely already seen the new Ted Bundy biopic on Netflix, Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, And Vile, which has James Hetfield in a small dramatic role or the first time in his career. Directed by Academy Award nominee Joe Berlinger (Paradise Lost), he cast Metallica legend James Hetfield in the role of Officer Bob Hayward, a no-nonsense Utah highway patrol veteran who was the first law enforcement officer to arrest Bundy in 1975 after pulling the killer over and discovering burglary tools in his car but wisely suspecting much worse. The film has a pivotal scene in which you can hear Metallica classic ‘The Four Horsemen’. This is not the first time the Kill Em All song has been in a movie, it also featured in 2016’s X-Men Apocalypse. The rest of the film features a 70s soundtrack such as Tommy James ‘Crimson And Clover’ (covered later by Joan Jett) and ‘Lucky Man’ by Emerson, Lake, and Palmer’s and also a Beethoven reference that might be a nod to Hannibal Lecter in Silence of The Lambs. Berlinger has been familiar with Hetfield and Metallica since he directed the Paradise Lost documentary series, co-directed the Metallica documentary film Some Kind of Monster, and co-wrote the book about the doc, Metallica: This Monster Lives. Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil stars Zac Efron as Bundy and tells the story of Bundy and his longtime girlfriend, played by Lily Collins, who at the time had no knowledge of the crimes. Continue reading

Metallica Books Show With The San Francisco Symphony In September

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, Metallica and the San Francisco Symphony have been booked to open the brand new Chase Center, the home of the Golden State Warriors on September 6th, in Mission Bay, CA. They will perform together at the show, reprising Metallica and a symphony for “one night only”. Warriors officials announced Monday, March 18 at a sweltering press conference attended by Metallica’s Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield, San Francisco Symphony Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas, Warriors Owner, and CEO Joe Lacob, Warriors President, and Chief Operating Officer Rick Welts and San Francisco Mayor London Breed. Metallica is no stranger to symphony collaborations, as they did an entire concert album with 1999’s S & M (Elektra Records), with 2019 marking the 20th anniversary of the album. Watch the press conference video below.  Continue reading

Metallica’s Death Magnetic Was Released Ten Years Ago

Being the biggest band the world has ever seen, both in the mind of fans and in terms of success is not all wine and roses. Metallica has taken their fair share of hits in the career from the fans and press at times, casting a fair but unflattering light. One such case is Death Magnetic (Warner/Vertigo), released ten years ago today, on September 12th, 2008. Although the album was considered a return to form musically after St. Anger, production issues sent diehards and haters alike into fits over the sound quality. Continue reading

Metallica’s “And Justice For All” Turns 30!

Today marks the thirtieth anniversary of Metallica’s And Justice For All (August 25th for some lucky folks in Europe). It was technically amazing, featured great songwriting, and immediately divided the fans. Sure every Metallica album has been an intentional departure from the last (see also David Bowie, Madonna, Deftones), but this album definitely jarred the fanbase when it first dropped. Sure we’ve heard over and over about the lack of bass or the inaudible bass, the “let’s see you play this!” long songs of over the top technicality, and the rushed solos Kirk Hammett recorded. Still, it’s an incredible, mostly heavy document of the band in one sense at a peak they have yet to return to creatively. Let’s take a quick look back at And Justice For All… Continue reading

Cane Hill – Too Far Gone

Nu-Metal doesn’t half get some stick, to the point where it has become the laughing stock sub-genre within the metal scene. Riding the crest of a new (nu? – Ed) wave of this beaten, bloody pulp style of metal is Cane Hill, whose 2016 debut record Smile (Rise) proved to be very divisive – not dissimilar to the way Korn and Limp Bizkit were treated back in the early Nineties, and look how that turned out in the end. Continue reading