Iggy Pop Shares New Music Video For “Loves Missing”

Iggy Pop has shared a new music video for his new single, ‘Loves Missing’, from his recently released new album Free (Loma Vista Recordings). Pop has been on a whirlwind of promotion for Free, appearing to perform ‘James Bond’ on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, and then an interview/ conversation with Jim Jarmusch at 92Y. Directed by Simon Taylor, the clip for “Loves Missing” was shot on location at Sweat Records in Miami with a special appearance by Ale Campos from Las Nubes, watch it now! Continue reading

Iggy Pop Shares New Song “James Bond”

Iggy Pop is releasing his 18th studio album Free on September 6th and he continues to be the inventive creative force he has been for almost fifty years. His new single, ‘James Bond’, features an incredible trumpet solo that explodes out of nowhere in the midst of its minimalistic, low-key instrumentation. Written and produced by Jazz trumpeter Leron Thomas, the song as a distinctly smoothed out vibe.  Continue reading

Tarja Turunen Reflects On Career, Touring, Mastering Her Craft, ProgPower USA, and More!

Ghost Cult had the honor of hanging out with Tarja Turunen in New York City last fall. She had just wowed a sold-out crowd at the Gramercy Theater the night before, as part of her first headline tour of America in almost ten years. Tarja released her amazing live album/DVD Act II, out now via earMusic spanning her entire career last year. In a candid wide-ranging chat at the Sir Henry Penthouse Hotel in mid-town Manhattan, Tarja discussed touring and keeping her voice in shape on the road, her Christmas tours, balancing family and being a working musician, her favorite composers, marking major anniversaries of Nightwish albums such as Oceanborn, favorite cover songs, new music in 2019 and much more. We send our thanks to Tarja for her generosity, her label, and PR team. Interview by Keefy and videography and photos by Omar Cordy of OJC Photography for Ghost Cult. Continue reading

Tarja – Act II

In 2016 Tarja Turunen set off on yet another epic touring adventure that would last for eighteen months, taking in forty countries and seeing the chanteuse perform to over a million people, fully cementing her status as a solo artist of some solo. To celebrate this monumental achievement, as she had done in 2012 with Act I, Tarja is releasing a multi-DVD / 2 CD documentation of a couple of the highlights of the tour; an intimate London show at the Metropolis Studios to a handful of fans recorded prior to the release of The Shadow Self, and a full concert experience from the Teatro della Luna, Milan, titled Act II (all earMUSIC). Continue reading

Battle Beast – Bringer Of Pain

When Battle Beast guitarist and co-founder Anton Kabanen left the band in 2015 shortly after their third album Unholy Savior (Nuclear Blast) had topped the charts in their native Finland, it left the remaining members somewhat unsure of their future. Continue reading

Phantasma – The Deviant Hearts

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It seems that being in one band just isn’t enough for some musicians these days. Especially within the European Power and Symphonic Metal scenes. Quite possibly two of the most (musically) incestuous genres of all, there seems to be an unwritten law that every band has to release an album featuring a bare minimum of one special guest, or contain at least two members who have performed, produced or written material for no fewer than three other bands. So it comes as no surprise to find that the first release from Phantasma, a collective effort from Charlotte Wessels (Delain), Georg Neuhauser (Serenity) and Oliver Philipps (Everon), contains performances from no less than six guest musicians. As enticing as that prospect may be to fans of the acts involved, it’s all too common for collaborations like this to end with mixed or disappointing results, and The Deviant Hearts (Napalm) is no exception.

Opening with a nice, but rather twee sounding duet from Wessels and Neuhauser, the piano played ‘Incomplete’ sounds like it would have been more at home at the end of the record rather than the beginning. Evergrey vocalist Tom Englund lends his voice to the powerful title track, and things continue in good form with ‘Runaway Gray’. Easily the best track on the album, it features a superb performance by Wessels, with more than a hint of James Bond theme song about the verses, and even a touch of Rush during the middle section.

Things take a hefty downward turn, however, with ‘Try’. A horribly overwrought ballad featuring Trans-Siberian Orchestra singer Chloe Lowery, who although clearly capable of belting out high notes with ease, seems unable to sing softly without her voice cracking on almost every line. ‘Enter Dreamscape’ is a substantial improvement on the previous track, but it’s still just standard fare which sounds like it could have been written for any band within the genre.

‘Miserable Me’ begins by slowing down and reworking the tune to ‘Money, Money, Money’ by Abba before plodding off to nowhere interesting. Duet ‘The Lotus and the Willow’ is an attempt at recreating the Nick Cave and Kylie Minogue classic ‘Where The Wild Roses Grow’ but falls miles short of the mark. An insipid and forgettable tune, the song only lifts off momentarily during its Top Gun-esque guitar solo. ‘Crimson Course’ is another nondescript song that sounds like it could have been written for anyone, and the only memorable thing about ‘Carry Me Home’ is the return of that Top Gun style guitar solo.

By now, everything has started to sound like music from movies and other bands, and ‘The Sound of Fear’ does nothing to change that by appearing to be several old songs at once. The upbeat ‘Novaturient’ rescues things a little until it tries to be Meat Loaf, and ‘Let It Die’ closes proceedings as best it can, but it’s essentially just another song with nothing more to offer than a reasonably strong chorus.

At its best, The Deviant Hearts is a good, listenable album with two or three memorable songs, a handful of strong choruses, and some excellent vocal performances by Wessels and Neuhauser. But for the most part, it’s just a collection of songs not strong enough to make it onto the albums of any of the bands involved.

 

5.5/10

 

GARY ALCOCK