EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Church Girls – Dry Out

Prolific indie punks Church Girls have come straight out of the clubs and house parties in Philadelphia, and right into your earpiece. On the heels of last years’ EP Home, the band is releasing another new EP in a few weeks. Cycles releases January 25th via Chatterbot Records, was produced by Scott Solter (The Mountain Goats, Okkervil River, Superchunk) and promises to bring a more fierce and personal tone to their music than ever before. Ghost Cult is proud to share their new single today, ‘Dry Out’, which we really dig. You will too! Continue reading

Daughters – You Won’t Get What You Want

You Won’t Get What You Want (Ipecac) sees the welcome return of Rhode Island creatives Daughters: this being their first album since their 2013 reformation, and fourth in all. The band’s affinity for complex noise is undiminished yet has refined with age and experience. Continue reading

Black Moth – Condemned to Hope

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2014 has been a ground-breaking, redefining year for doom, almost overriding the fact that many of the genre’s female-fronted outfits have produced some mesmerising music for a couple of years now. The unique qualities of Harriet Bevan‘s Leeds quintet Black Moth have been setting tongues wagging for some time and second album Condemned to Hope (New Heavy Sounds) reaffirms their particular status of a sassy, doom-rooted outfit whose satirical outlook is augmented with biting lyrics on modern life.

The colossal groove of opener ‘Tumbleweave’ lends gravity to whimsical lyrics about “porkers from the Daily Mail”, paper tiaras and burger queens, all delivered in Harriet’s laconic, incanting yet quintessentially English voice. Riffs crash rather than rumble yet still carry weight, with variations between trad doom and the stoner currents of ‘Looner’, whilst Jim Swainston‘s lead-work is flashing, emotive, and carved from the finest slabs of 70s heavy rock.

Atmospherics abound with the threatening fizz of amps during hushed moments of the stellar, sexy ‘The Undead King of Rock ‘n’ Roll’, resonant tub-thumping heightening the sinister effect and slower sections possessing a bewitching sway that’s difficult to resist. Guitars occasionally have shimmering pedal effects similar to those of The Wounded Kings Steve Mills, more often applied to the lead but muddying Nico Carew‘s riffs deliciously on the cascading, swirling ‘The Last Maze’, which is also graced by one of Swainston’s more memorable solos. Aside from those waggish phrasings other styles are infiltrated, with the indie-punk of ‘White Lies’ and ‘Room 13’ blending with a reverberating low end and complementing the Britpop feel of the lyrics and delivery. ‘Slumber with the Worm’, meanwhile, marries a Pulp Fiction-esque spaghetti twang with lead riffs verging on black metal.

This may not wield the same portentous mass as some of its contemporaries, and Bevan’s voice occasionally shows limits, save for some soaring notes on the hypnotic closing title track. All of this, however, enhances Black Moth’s charm and identity. They’re a little bit different and, in the quirky fashion of oddities from these shores, unmistakably ours. Quite frankly this rips, and deserves some serious investigation.

7.5/10

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PAUL QUINN