ALBUM REVIEW: Them Moose Rush – Dancing Maze

Croatian trio Them Moose Rush, for those who’ve never had the pleasure, are pleasantly bonkers. It’s kind of like putting Jane’s Addiction and Captain Beefheart in a blender, and seeing what crazy shit results. The chaotic twists and turns within third album Dancing Maze (Dostava Zvuka) are all named after random people’s belongings or actions and allow accessibility despite the complexity of the music. Continue reading

ALBUM REVIEW: The Earth Below – Nothing Works Vol 2: Hymns for Useless Gods

Deepak Raghu is an extremely diverse, creative entity. His previous forays into Rock and Metal have embraced many outlying elements such as Americana, Folk, and Soul: on Nothing Works Vol 2: Hymns for Useless Gods (Unheard Music), his latest outing with solo project The Earth Below, he melds those traditional sounds with melodic weight, in turn baffling and eventually ensnaring the senses. Continue reading

Daniel Cavanagh – Monochrome

As a founding member of UK prog band Anathema, Daniel Cavanagh is no stranger to writing powerful music that wears its emotions firmly on its sleeve; most recently personified in the sublime The Optimist (Kscope). Cited at various places throughout that album’s promotion was Daniel Cavanagh’s struggle with depression and the low points that he reached in that time. In the light of these battles, solo album Monochrome (Kscope) is a deeply personal record that, in comparison to the emboldened vision of The Optimist, feels more to the bone and loses none of the expected emotional resonance. Continue reading

Chon – Homey

With the release of their début full-length album Grow (Sumerian) in 2015, Californian’s Chon found themselves standing out from a peer group they were arguably unfairly lumped in. Perhaps due to the Sumerian Records ties, but their début saw them linked to the contemporary Tech/Metalcore scene despite their sound being more technical, but smooth jazz with little to no signs of metal whatsoever. If such pigeonholing was unfair back then, on new album Homey (Sumerian), any comparisons to the like would prove practically absurd. Continue reading