Revocation – The Outer Ones

In terms of contemporary Death Metal acts, Revocation has been very prominent and a flag-bearer, yet have not always been the most consistent in terms of releases. Always proving very technically and progressively proficient and with a couple of very strong albums, namely 2014’s Deathless (Metal Blade), they can also often felt a bit too clinical and unfeeling on record. Despite this, Revocation is a clearly talented and strong act, and have always threatened to deliver a truly killer album with that sense of urgency; that album being latest effort The Outer Ones (Metal Blade). Continue reading

David Davidson Talks New Revocation Music, Side Projects, And More!

Ever since the release of Great Is Our Sin last year, Revocation has been out bringing that crushing new material to audiences all over the world. The guys are currently tearing it up with Cattle Decapitation, Full Of Hell, and Artificial Brain here in the States, and I got to catch up with front man David Davidson at their recent stop here in New York City. Continue reading

Revocation – Great Is Our Sin

Revocation – Great Is Our Sin metal blade ghostcultmag

Formed in 2000, Boston act Revocation have come along way since starting life under the rather uninspiring name of Cryptic Warning. Sounding like a particularly vicious blend of Sepultura and Pantera, the band were already exhibiting great technical skill, but changing both their direction and name in 2006 took things to the next level. Two years later they unleashed their début album, the self-released Empire of the Obscene, and the transformation was astonishing.

Effortlessly combining Technical Death Metal and Thrash, the band released four more albums, each one just as blistering as the last, but moving forwards each time, adding more melodic, Jazz, and traditional metal aspects along the way without losing any of their signature attack.

Now, there comes a time when after a number of well-received releases, a band will eventually feel a backlash. Well, if Revocation are to be on the end of such a thing, then it certainly won’t be with this album as Great is Our Sin (Metal Blade) is every bit as good as their previous five albums. Picking a highlight is a ridiculously difficult task as virtually everything hits the mark perfectly, but listen out for the Steve Vai-esque guitar solo on ‘Monolithic Ignorance’, Brett Bamberger‘s bass line at the beginning of ‘Crumbling Imperium’, and the drums on, well… everything. Anyone concerned about 3 Inches of Blood drummer Ash Pearson not being up to the task of stepping into the formidable shoes of Phil Dubois-Coyne can stop worrying right now.

The guitar work here is sensational; Dan Gargiulo and vocalist/founder member David Davidson utilising many different styles to get their point across without ever feeling forced or awkward. Oh, and just when you think it can’t get any better, here comes Marty Friedman with a guest spot on the quite brilliant ‘The Exaltation’.

Being overly critical, it could be said that Zeuss‘s production maybe isn’t quite as crisp as it could be, and although well played, the cover of ‘Altar of Sacrifice’ by Slayer is exactly what it is – a bonus track. Overall though, Great Is Our Sin is yet another triumph by Revocation. A thundering wall of sound replete with Jazz breaks, virtuoso solos, inhuman vocals, and an abundance of influences. Everyone from Iron Maiden and Testament to Gojira, Cynic and Gorguts and in between. And more.

8.5/10

GARY ALCOCK

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With Nietzsche’s Blessing – An Interview With Revocation

revocation20131Revocation are one of the rising stars within the technical metal segment. Chaos of Forms, their previous album, succeeded in placing them firmly in the public eye and their latest self titled release will undoubtedly make them a household name. Ghost Cult caught up with David Davidson (guitars/vocals) to pick his brains about the latest opus, their participation in the Summer Slaughter Tour and the band’s fondness for tackling serious themes. Continue reading