Dumb and Dumbest Episode #261: Band Photos For Dummies

Photography is often the first impression a band makes on a potential fan, even before they hear music or see album artwork or other merch. Still, this is one of the most overlooked, mistake-ridden areas of the industry. Dumb and Dumbest #261 is streaming now and it’s all about Band Photos For Dummies with Keefy from Ghost Cult! Dumb and Dumbest is hosted by Matt Bacon (Dropout Media, Ripple Music, Prophecy Productions) and Publicist Curtis Dewar (Dewar PR), in addition to the podcast, Matt and Curtis host The Music Marketing Challenge, a low-cost, super high-value private training to bands and artists. Get hands-on practical experience to market your band like a pro today! Message them at the links below.  Continue reading

New Photo Exhibition by Tom Hearn Focuses on The Ramones, Opens Tomorrow in New York

Connecticut based photographer Tom Hearn was fortunate enough to document The Ramones at the height of the burgeoning Punk scene in the mid-1970s. This weekend in New York a new exhibition of his photography, The First Time I saw the Ramones, a solo exhibition by Hearn opens at 72 Gallery in New York City. The collected photos are from July 22 1976 when Tom was asked by his friend Legs McNeil (Please Kill Me) to see the Ramones play at the Arcadia Ballroom in New Haven. The exhibition runs until June 6th and the gallery is typically open Tuesday through Sunday, with details below. 

Continue reading

Dumb And Dumbest 71: Arch Enemy Photographer Controversy

Episode 71 of the Dumb and Dumbest Podcast is steaming right now, and it’s about the Arch Enemy Photographer Controversy. Dumb and Dumbest is a music industry podcast hosted by music executive Matt Bacon (Dropout Media, Ripple Music, Prophecy Productions) and Publicist Curtis Dewar (Dewar PR).  Matt and Curtis discuss the rub between concert photographers and established bands and what the boundaries are for fair usage and credit. 

Continue reading

Rex Brown And Photographer Joe Giron To Host Pantera Book Signing This Weekend

Pantera, photo credit Joe Giron/Lesser Gods

Pantera, photo credit Joe Giron/Lesser Gods

Rex Brown and photographer/author Joe Giron will get together in New Jersey this weekend for a signing of Joe’s book A Vulgar Display of Pantera our now on the Lesser Gods Publishing imprint. Continue reading

Joe Giron – A Vulgar Display Of Pantera

A Vulgar Display of Pantera book cover ghostcultmag

Chances are your first memory of a band after you’ve heard the music for the first time was through a photo. There was a time before YouTube videos, massive concert tours, and ubiquitous festivals that the only way you ever saw a band was in a magazine. Now that technology has made it possible for everyone with an iPhone or a decent DSLR camera to think they are a concert photographer, everyone and their mom is trying to shoot and cover bands. However, there is more to pictures of bands than aiming a device in the general direction of the stage; there is an art to capturing the essence of people, on film, or now digitally.

Continue reading

On The Road… with ZZ Top

600_435176989

After an astounding 46 years as one of America’s premier rock bands, ZZ Top are still able to draw big crowds and thrill with their no nonsense bluesy rock. It’s the simplicity of the concept that has maintained the bands’ lasting charm. As their motto goes: “Same three guys, same three chords.” And it still works after all these years. Out on the road continuing to play behind the Live At Montreux DVD (Eagle Rock Records), ZZ Top are kicking as much ass as they ever have. At a recent tour stop at Arizona’s Talking Stick Resort, and playing a set of greatest hits, deep cuts, and covers (Jimi Hendrix, Muddy Waters), the band was in top form. Thanks to Melina Dellamarggio of Melina D. Photography for sharing this photo set with Ghost Cult.

ZZ Top, by Melina D. Photography

ZZ Top, by Melina D. Photography

ZZ Top, by Melina D. Photography

ZZ Top, by Melina D. Photography

ZZ Top, by Melina D. Photography

ZZ Top, by Melina D. Photography

ZZ Top, by Melina D. Photography

ZZ Top, by Melina D. Photography

[slideshow_deploy id=’24435′]

Not Just Tits in a Corset, by Jill Hughes Kirtland

Not just book cover

Women in heavy music is a polarizing topic, steeped in sexism and fraught with concepts of ability, power and entitlement. For female musicians who love their music hard, not much has changed since the 70’s when certain brave women cranked their amps to 11 and dared to rock a stage. There may be more female musicians in bands nowadays, but it takes more than numbers to establish true progress. There have been articles, books and blogs written about it, so does Not Just Tits in a Corset by writer/photographer Jill Hughes Kirtland break any new ground?

Well, not really. However, what Kirtland has done was put together a comprehensive book celebrating the past and present women of Metal, and letting them tell their stories as opposed to the author voicing her views with trite comments from the musicians thrown in. It is a good read, and it was great that she not only mentioned and interviewed famous Metal women such as Cristina Scabbia and Angela Gossow, but that she dug a little deeper, featuring unsung heroines such as Addie Lee of Fanny, Betsy Bitch of Bitch, and Linda McDonald of Phantom Blue/Iron Maidens. It is structured in a linear way, from The Runaways and Fanny in the 70’s, through the 80’s with the California scenes and to the Hard Rock/Metal Queens of today. Throughout, the song sadly remains the same then as now – incredible highs of success, camaraderie, male support and total control of the music and image, to the lows of sexism, disrespect, and dismissive attitudes. Kirtland never loses sight of keeping things positive overall, focusing on how these women have persevered and remained true to their calling. It had to be a tough balance for Kirtland in trying to create a layout and flow that was eye-catching and easy to read, but still had journalistic integrity. There are times when artists are mentioned in a cursory manner, but that is tempered by powerful statements from several women who have been in the trenches. The Table of Contents’ many exclamation points screams “tabloid” and initially raises some doubts about how serious this book could be taken, but then her heart-felt preface dials it back to why the screaming is necessary – to be heard and to be taken seriously – by those who refuse to pay attention and acknowledge woman’s presence in this scene as musicians, writers, managers, label-owners, promoters, photographers, etc. I also commend Kirtland for not only focusing on the female Metal singers, but also reminding readers that many women are actually instrumentalists in the band, interviewing such as hard-hitting drummers as Justine Ethier (Blackguard) and Roxy Patrucci (Vixen). There are certain notable hard rockin’ women that are not mentioned at all (no Heart? No Skin from Skunk Anansie? No Ice Age?), but that just shows how many women were and are out there in Hard Rock/Metal doing their thing!

The mighty Doro Pesch does the preface and is further featured in the book. This is totally fitting, and I feel that if there was one woman who embodies the enduring spirit of Metal, it is her. There are many great pictures of the artists, making the book better for your coffee table than on a shelf. Not Just Tits in a Corset may not leave the reader feeling any better (or different) about how women in Metal are viewed and treated, but it will leave a sense of pride, positivity and empowerment while turning one on to artists they may not have heard of before. A satisfying blend of history, commentary, pictures and styles, this is a book that is a must-read for every Metalhead worth her – and his – salt.

8.5/10

Buy the book!

Women in Metal Book on Facebook

LYNN JORDAN