The Dandy Warhols – Juniore: Live at Albert Hall, Manchester (UK)

Sub-zero temperatures are the norm at the moment, so after having to cancel a gig last-minute the previous night due to travel issues, I redoubled my effort to make it for The Dandy Warhols, touring for their 25th anniversary. A single support band, in the form of French Psych-Pop outfit Juniore were around to warm up the crowd, so I braved the cold and head on across to Manchester’s Albert Hall for the evening’s entertainment. It’s also my first time at the venue, and being a Grade 2 listed building means that accessibility help is hard for them, but they bend over backwards to help however they can (even when I only asked for help on arrival), which they deserve a lot of praise for, while the setting itself is stunning, providing a great backdrop for the evening’s music.  Continue reading

Fine Creatures- Electric La La Land

 

Describing one’s self as “The Dirty Beatles”, however tongue in cheek is pretty self-evidently a bold statement of intent. When it’s a claim made by a group in such an early stage about to release their debut EP release its definitely going to raise some eyebrows. At first glance/listen Electric La La Land (Symptom) may feel like a fairly generic but fun, sunshine ready release; but upon closer inspection Fine Creatures have provided an unexpected level of depth. Continue reading

Tijuana Bibles – Sun Chaser (Single)

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Despite not having even released a full length album, and thus far one EP and single, Glasgow’s Tijuana Bibles have already accomplished quite the feats, most notably several small festival appearances and one at T In The Park; not something that every band you will find in these pages can claim. In anticipation of their upcoming release, these youngsters unveil latest single, the very catchy Sun Chaser (Pling).

On evidence of this single, it seems Tijuana Bibles have their ears to several phases of British influence. The main bulk sits strongly with indie rock and even a little Britpop, but doesn’t have quite the over-sanitized sheen or overly pop air of such mainstream radio fodder. Coupled with the hints of psychedelic and even blues hiding away and what we have here is signs of something special. On this single alone it seems that these guys’ future is very bright and should see acclaim from both the mainstream audiences and to those looking for something a little different.

 

7.0/10

Tijuana Bibles on Facebook

 

CHRIS TIPPELL

Black Moth – Condemned to Hope

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2014 has been a ground-breaking, redefining year for doom, almost overriding the fact that many of the genre’s female-fronted outfits have produced some mesmerising music for a couple of years now. The unique qualities of Harriet Bevan‘s Leeds quintet Black Moth have been setting tongues wagging for some time and second album Condemned to Hope (New Heavy Sounds) reaffirms their particular status of a sassy, doom-rooted outfit whose satirical outlook is augmented with biting lyrics on modern life.

The colossal groove of opener ‘Tumbleweave’ lends gravity to whimsical lyrics about “porkers from the Daily Mail”, paper tiaras and burger queens, all delivered in Harriet’s laconic, incanting yet quintessentially English voice. Riffs crash rather than rumble yet still carry weight, with variations between trad doom and the stoner currents of ‘Looner’, whilst Jim Swainston‘s lead-work is flashing, emotive, and carved from the finest slabs of 70s heavy rock.

Atmospherics abound with the threatening fizz of amps during hushed moments of the stellar, sexy ‘The Undead King of Rock ‘n’ Roll’, resonant tub-thumping heightening the sinister effect and slower sections possessing a bewitching sway that’s difficult to resist. Guitars occasionally have shimmering pedal effects similar to those of The Wounded Kings Steve Mills, more often applied to the lead but muddying Nico Carew‘s riffs deliciously on the cascading, swirling ‘The Last Maze’, which is also graced by one of Swainston’s more memorable solos. Aside from those waggish phrasings other styles are infiltrated, with the indie-punk of ‘White Lies’ and ‘Room 13’ blending with a reverberating low end and complementing the Britpop feel of the lyrics and delivery. ‘Slumber with the Worm’, meanwhile, marries a Pulp Fiction-esque spaghetti twang with lead riffs verging on black metal.

This may not wield the same portentous mass as some of its contemporaries, and Bevan’s voice occasionally shows limits, save for some soaring notes on the hypnotic closing title track. All of this, however, enhances Black Moth’s charm and identity. They’re a little bit different and, in the quirky fashion of oddities from these shores, unmistakably ours. Quite frankly this rips, and deserves some serious investigation.

 

7.5/10

Black Moth on Facebook

 

PAUL QUINN