MSRY – Safety First

MSRY is the band that felt like the hardcore classification simply wasn’t enough, so they branded themselves as Miserable Hardcore. I first misread that as “melodic hardcore” but melody is in short supply on their self-released Safety First EP. Misery, however, is available in spades and that’s without mentioning the surplus of rage. And how does a power trio sans bassist work up such ugly emotions? By taking a look at the world at large, of course.

The frequent sampling of Prime Minister Theresa May’s speeches, staccato Pantera-styled guitars and frequent double kick patterns on ‘Freedom’ tells me MSRY are about as cheerful as Morrissey with regards to the post-Brexit UK. But the rage reaches across the pond as well and MSRY have choice things to say about America’s current embarrassment in office. Sure, a title like ‘Trump Card’ gives away the game immediately, but as soon as the pounding begins it appears that MSRY may be more upset about the American state of affairs than those at home. Sandwiched between copious Donald Trump soundbites is basically a wide variety of small but equally potent breakdowns. And as a man who personally despises Trump I’m delighted that MSRY mirror matches my displeasure for the man.

While America’s decision to elect the human embodiment of the ugly American trope will make for biting comedy and furious punk records (see Safety First), I still feel the need to apologize. On behalf of America I’d like to apologize for Trump’s presidency which just feels like an amalgamation of processed ready to eat meals, ignorantly chanting “USA” during sporting events, and shitty American cars with chintzy plastic interiors and even worse gas mileage. Sorry because he’s the worst of our traits on display for all to see.

That out of my system, Safety First only stumbles early on tracks like ‘S.I.C.K.’ because there maybe isn’t a specific target in mind and not enough riffs to shake off some of the monochrome textures. Also, I can’t help but wonder how much more lethal the sound would be if there was low-end or maybe an additional guitarist.

But this is more than adequate jumping off point for those miserable lads. Anger and misery are much more useful than despair these days.

7.0/10

HANS LOPEZ