ALBUM REVIEW: Moths – Space Force – Self-Released


Moths, the five-piece stoner/prog outfit from San Juan, Puerto Rico, take a voyage into space on their debut LP. As cosmic and inter-galactic as the results are, this mission perhaps required more focus, more direction and a tad more discipline. The myriad metal genres, frequently-changing time signatures and disparate musical sections idiosyncratically grafted together into songs can make it hard to grasp or nail down any plan behind it all.

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ALBUM REVIEW: The Halo Effect – Days Of The Lost


 

Although lockdown was undeniably a desperate time for the entertainment business, for some, the time spent in isolation actually created opportunities. With schedules and timetables suddenly emptied, many long-standing ideas and projects, that for whatever reason, looked set to never get off the ground, were finally able to grow and develop into something more than a mere hopeful nucleus of an ideaContinue reading


CONCERT REVIEW: Halestorm – The Pretty Reckless – The Warning and Lilith Czar Live at Bank of New Hampshire Pavillion


 

Gilford New Hampshire welcomed Halestorm, The Pretty Reckless, The Warning, and Lilith Czar for a great night of female-led rock n roll bands. Lilith Czar opened the show and performed many songs off her debut album “Created from Filth and Dust” and an incredible cover of Stevie Nicks’s “Edge of Seventeen.” Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: Liminal Shroud – All Virtues Ablaze


 

Over the years I have slowly come around to liking more black metal projects, but none do more justice than those that focus on the atmosphere that brings you on a journey. British Columbia’s own Liminal Shroud does just this on their second full-length, All Virtues Ablaze (Willowtip Records). In just under forty minutes (across only four tracks), this album will be sure to be part of many conversations towards the end of the year.Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: The Interrupters – In The Wild


It’s easy to forget how courageous and inspiring it is to lay all your cards on the table, especially as an artist in the public eye. To the layperson, it might feel uncomfortable if a few friends or family members find something out about them that’s personal or revealingContinue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: Psycroptic – Divine Council


 

In the two (plus!) decades since their inception, it seems that Tasmanian death metallers Psycroptic have simultaneously had their plaudits and yet also feel like an underrated act, especially considering their ascent in their recent albums. Whilst 2003’s The Scepter of the Ancients was an early career high point, it wasn’t until 2015’s self titled effort (and first on current label Prosthetic) where they began to show themselves again amongst the upper echelon of bands in their field. If this was an arguable statement previously, Divine Council is the album that makes it a certainty.

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ALBUM REVIEW: H.E.A.T. – Force Majeur


 

As subtle as a brick and as silly as a juggling monkey riding a unicycle, Swedish Hard Rockers H.E.A.T are back with new album Force Majeure (earMUSIC). It is the Swedes seventh record and despite its over the top, everything and the kitchen sink nature it is a damn good time. It is a rich mixture of AOR, glam metal and hard rock with big riffs, flashy solos and huge choruses coming at you thick and fast. Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: Soulfly – Totem


Max Cavalera, a true legend and without a doubt one of the hardest working men in Metal, is back with the first new Soulfly music since Ritual in 2018. Although never one to sit on his laurels, since then Max has also treated us to Reluctant Hero (2020), the second album from his Killer Be Killed side project, and last year’s excellent nod to the old school and self-proclaimed “Caveman Metal” record, Go Ahead And Die, with his son Igor. Continue reading


ALBUM REVIEW: Carrion Vael – Abhorrent Obsessions


 

For what it’s worth, there seems to be quite the shift in a certain corner of the Melodic Death Metal camp as bands are increasingly shying away from the vintage, glossy (as glossy as death metal can get) vocals in favor of more biting, explosive intensity that prioritizes grit over rudimentary formulae.

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